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Technical - Workshop Notes
2024-03  March

Harry_Frame_Pieces_Screenshot_2024-02-18_12-31-24.jpg

2024-03  March

“Beauty of using a FLAT TOP Saw Blade"

An interview with Harry Deschepper, helping with KDWC Club Project

This article shares a bridal joint technique used by Harry Deschepper when he and Andre Cook were making a series of frames for a Club project. 

The objective:   To make a series of square frames, dimension of 18mm x 18mm x length, using a 6mm kerf flat top saw blade.

 

Technique:   All cuts are 18mm deep.  Use a table saw with a 6mm flat top blade.  Cut the centre channel first, so that when making the two outer cuts, they can be adjusted to fit the channel.

 

1. In the first piece, cut 6mm out of the centre of an end, leaving a 6mm full width mortice.

2. In the matching piece, cut 6mm (blade width) on either edge at the end leaving a centred 6mm tenon that fits (1).

Warning:   It should be pointed out, that this can be a dangerous method.

The table saw cuts should be made in longer length pieces of timber and trimmed to the final 18mm width after the cuts are complete.   It is also advisable to use featherboards to keep the timber flush to the fence. I used a stackable featherboard from Timbecon as per the attached pic.

Here is a website link that explains the technique rather well.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O8-E4qjxPz0&t=196

Clamping and gluing was made easy by making up 6 frames at a go, as seen in the picture below.

For anybody lacking a router and table combo,  this table top saw method is a great alternative.

Below is an example of the blade used, and the jig for cutting the pieces.

Happy Jointing!    

Shared by Harry Deschepper

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Harry_jig_for_flat_top_KERF_cut_3981581996895584442.jpg
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